3 Reasons You Have to Switch to HTTPS

Oct 17, 2018 | Hosting

Switch to HTTPS now.

Switching HTTP to HTTPS

HTTP was the standard protocol for sending information across the internet since near the dawn of the web. It’s been so ubiquitous that few people even reference those first letters and symbols at the beginning of a web address.

But few things in tech last forever, and HTTPS is looking to replace HTTP as the de facto browser protocol. 

HTTP, the old system, is an unsecured method, meaning any information you share, credit card info, logins, personal information, can be easily intercepted. The “S” in HTTPS stands for “secure” and it represents a major upgrade over the old method.

In order to send information over a secure connection, your business will need to acquire an SSL certificate. The SSL certificate binds together your web address and your organizational identity and location. Installing this certificate is the first step in switching from HTTP to HTTPS. 

Below are 3 reasons you have to make the switch.

Trust

According to the Edelman Trust Barometer, faith is rapidly eroding in all areas of public life. Government, business, media, even NGO’s are trusted by less than 50% of the worldwide population.

Trust is a precious commodity, difficult to manufacture and easily squandered.

So, imagine the response of a customer when they type in your web address, and just to the right of it they read the words: “Not Secure.”

This is the kiss of death if you have an e-commerce site. It’s an equally discouraging signal to customers whose email addresses you may want to collect.

Since July of 2018, Google Chrome, the most popular web browser in the US, has included this foreboding message in the address bar for every site that has not migrated to HTTPS. 

If the perception of danger loses you a single customer, is it worth it?

Safety

Perceived danger is an obstacle, sure, but switching from HTTP to HTTPS is not just about optics. The “s” in HTTPS stands for “secure,” and this updated protocol is much more difficult to hack.

Widely available tools and browser plugins make it simple for even a child to digitally eavesdrop on your traffic over a public network. Basic-level hackers can see all the content you view on HTTP sites, steal login credentials and inject malware with minimal effort. 

Interference isn’t limited to hackers either. Internet service and hotspot providers have been caught inserting their own ad content into pages being viewed over HTTP connections. In theory, this kind of data tampering could also be executed by the government.

The old “X-Files” mantra of “Trust no one,” used to sound like paranoia. Well, it’s not paranoia if someone’s really following you.

Google

Since 2014, Google has acknowledged that their search algorithm rewards sites that are verified “secure.” This near-monopolistic search engine has an almost 75% market share, and they almost never reveal details about their constantly-updated formula, so this information can only be ignored at your own risk.

Additionally, if you are using Google Analytics to track your web traffic and key performance indicators, a practice we highly recommend, you may be receiving inaccurate data regarding your HTTP site. Analytics regularly confuses Referral traffic and Direct traffic on these outdated sites. This error could lead to misdirected marketing strategies and budgetary misfires.

Staying on an HTTP site puts your data and your bottom line at risk.

The only drawback to making the switch is the small amount of time required to set up the appropriate re-directs and re-establishing accurate links, but you should ask yourself – is it worth the extra time I spend every day to lock my door when I leave the house?

Taking basic steps to safeguard your most valuable possessions is worth the time spent.

Every minute you waste is a minute your door has been left wide open. Contact the experts at Informatics today and make the switch to HTTPS.